DukeXray

Java 8 is awesome. Period. But… after we had the chance to have fun and play around with it, the time has come to quit avoiding the grain of salt. All good things come with a price and in this post I will share the main pain points of Java 8. Make sure you’re aware of these before upgrading and letting go of 7.

Continue Reading…

Developer Newsletters

“My dear, here we must run as fast as we can, just to stay in place. And if you wish to go anywhere you must run twice as fast as that”. Said the Red Queen to Alice, capturing the software development landscape in a nutshell. It’s evolving fast. Super fast. And it’s hard to keep track of the hottest news without letting quality content slip through the cracks. In this post we’ve collected a list of newsletters by devoted curators, all of whom are developers, who face the same problem of information overload (and tired of spam just as you do, so rest assured your email is in safe keeping). For the days when you can’t find the time to reach the HN or reddit tab and the next free spot on your calendar is 3 weeks from now. I hope this post will help you make sure no precious gems are left behind. Check them out and pick the few you like best.

Continue Reading…

Duke Ribbon

Get ready to lock and load through this quick overview of some of the newest most innovative, tools around. In case you’ve missed it, RebelLabs recently released the results of a global survey of the Java tools and technologies landscape. Alongside the big names and established tools, the market is bubbling with fresh tools and frameworks that not so many people have heard of (yet). In this post I decided to gather a short list of such tools, most of them launched just recently. Some are Java specific and some support other languages as well, but they’re all great for Java projects and share a vision of simplicity. Let’s roll.

Continue Reading…

Blog_key_

Synchronized sections are kind of like visiting your parents-in-law. You want to be there as little as possible. When it comes to locking the rules are the same – you want to spend the shortest amount of time acquiring the lock and within the critical section, to prevent bottlenecks from forming.

The core language idiom for locking has always been the synchronized keyword, for methods and discrete blocks. This keyword is really hardwired into the HotSpot JVM. Each object we allocate in our code, be it a String, Array or a full-blown JSON document, has locking capabilities built right into its header at the native GC level. The same goes for the JIT compiler that compiles and re-compiles bytecode depending on the specific state and contention levels for a specific lock.

The problem with synchronized blocks is that they’re all or nothing – you can’t have more than one thread inside a critical section. This is especially a bummer in consumer / producer scenarios, where some threads are trying to edit some data exclusively, while others are only trying to read it and are fine with sharing access.

Continue Reading…

GitHub VS. BitBucket

 

Let’s go back to 2005 when Bitkeeper, host of the Linux kernel project back then, pulled the trigger and changed its core policies around pricing. The kernel’s license was an especially thorny issue after a free Bitkeeper clone was created by Andrew Tridgell – a key figure in the open-source community. Linus Torvalds didn’t like how the whole thing unfolded (to say the least), and began working on his own distributed version control system called Git (British slang for rotten person).

He’s famously quoted for it: “I’m an egotistical bastard, so I name all my projects after myself. First Linux, now Git”. Mercurial was another worthy alternative being developed for the Linux kernel by Matt Mackall with a similar purpose. Git eventually prevailed, and 3 years after that Bitbucket and GitHub were born. If one existed, I would pay honest money to watch a documentary about the full story.

But now that we’re done with this short piece of repo-history, let’s dig deeper at what each service offers us today, and also share some insights we gathered over time from our own experience with buckets and octocats.

Continue Reading…

Blog_treasure box__

Lambdas lambdas lambdas. That’s all you ever hear about when talking about Java 8. But that’s just one part. Java 8 has a lot of new features – some are powerful new classes and idioms, while others are just things that should have been there from the get-go.

I wanted to go over ten new features which I consider to be little gems definitely worth knowing about. There are bound to be at least one or two you’d like to try, so let’s get going!

1. Default Methods

A new addition to the Java language, you can now add method bodies to interfaces (called default methods). These methods are implicitly added to every class which implements the interface.

This enables you to add functionality to existing libraries without breaking code. That’s definitely a plus. The flip side is that this seriously blurs the line between an interface, which is meant to serve as a contract, and a class which serves as its concrete implementation. In the right hands this can be an elegant way to make interfaces smarter, avoid repetition and extend libraries. In the wrong hands, we’ll soon be seeing interface methods querying this and casting it to a concrete type. Shivers….

Continue Reading…

blog_boat (1)

Splunk vs. Sumo Logic vs. LogStash vs. GrayLog vs. Loggly vs. PaperTrails vs. Splunk>Storm

 

Splunk, Sumo Logic, LogStash, GrayLog, Loggly, PaperTrails – did I miss someone? I’m pretty sure I did. Logs are like fossil fuels – we’ve been wanting to get rid of them for the past 20 years, but we’re not quite there yet. Well, if that’s the case I want a BMW!

To deal with the growth of log data a host of log management & analysis tools have been built over the last few years to help developers and operations make sense of the growing data. I thought it’d be interesting to look at our options and what are each tools’ selling point, from a developer’s standpoint.

Splunk

As the biggest tool in this space, I decided to put Splunk in a category of its own. That’s not to say it’s the best tool for what you need, but more to give credit to a product who essentially created a new category.

Pros

Splunk is probably the most feature rich solution in the space. It’s got hundreds of apps (I counted 537) to make sense of almost every format of log data, from security to business analytics to infrastructure monitoring. Splunk’s search and charting tools are feature rich to the point that there’s probably no set of data you can’t get to through its UI or APIs.

Continue Reading…

Blog-sheeps

I just lOvE new toys, and Java 8 has a bunch of them. This time around I want to talk about one of my favourites – concurrent adders. This is a new set of classes for managing counters written and read by multiple threads. The new API promises significant performance gains, while still keeping things simple and straightforward.

As people have been managing concurrent counters since the dawn of multi-core architectures, let’s take a look and see what are some of the options Java offered up until now, and how they perform compared to this new API.

Dirty counters – this approach means you’re writing / reading from a regular object or static field across multiple threads. Unfortunately, this doesn’t work for two reasons. The first is that in Java, an A += B operation isn’t Atomic. If you open up the output bytecode, you’ll see at least four instructions – one for loading the field value from the heap into the thread stack, a second for loading the delta, a third to add them and the fourth to set the result into the field.

If more than one thread is doing this at the same time for the same memory location, you run a high chance of missing out on a write operation, as one thread can override the value of another (AKA “read-modify-write”). There’s also another nasty angle to this which has to do with the volatility of the value. More on that below.

Continue Reading…

15 Must Read Java 8 Tutorials

By Tal Weiss —  April 9, 2014 — 4 Comments

Blog_Green Board

 

Java 8 was released last month and is just chock-full of new features and behind-the-scenes optimizations. The internet has been doing quite a good job covering all these new additions – both the good and the bad. I thought it’d be good to do a round-up of what we think are some of the best tutorials out there, to help you get you quickly up-to-speed on what’s new and what you need to know.

Java 8 New Features List

Let’s start with the basics – the official OpenJDK list of new features in the Java 8 core library, JVM and the JDK. This is a must read.

The OpenJDK 8 new features list

Lambda Expressions

Hailed as the biggest change to the language in the last decade, Java 8’s Lambda expressions finally deliver core elements of functional programming that have been made popular with languages such as Scala and Clojure right to your doorstep.

This is really one of those cases where I suggest going with the official documentation and tutorials first -

The official Java Lambda expressions tutorial

An extensive Lambda expressions tutorial with examples

Continue Reading…

Blog_socks03

I’m a great multi-tasker. Even as I’m writing this post, I can still find room to feel awkward about a remark I made yesterday at a party that had everyone looking at me strange. Well, the good news is I’m not alone – Java 8 is also pretty good at multi-tasking. Let’s see how.

One of the key new features introduced in Java 8 is parallel array operations. This includes things like the ability to sort, filter and group items using Lambda expressions that automatically leverage multi-core architectures. The promise here is to get an immediate performance boost with minimal effort from our end as Java developers. Pretty cool.

So the question becomes – how fast is this thing, and when should I use it? Well, the quick answer is sadly – it depends. Wanna know on what? read on.

Continue Reading…